PROJECT #005: BATH BOMB RECIPE FOR HUMID CLIMATES

ocean waves

I live very close to the ocean. No, I mean, very close to the ocean. Practically inside the waves. So it’s extremely humid all the time, and impossible to make bath bombs. At least, not with any recipe I could find, so I had to invent a new one because I reeally wanted to make some heart shaped Valentines bombs. So, if you too are an undersea creature who has had dismal results with your bath bombs, please try this waterless recipe with only 3 main ingredients, and enjoy being part of our special club.

Note: This recipe will only work for very humid climates, and will need added moisture in drier environments.

Waterless Recipe for humid climates: Rooibos Tea & Coconut Oil Bath BombsWhat I learnt:

Most recipes call for a few milliliters of water spritzed onto the dry ingredients and mixed in, but in my experience, if I so much as showed my mixture a photo of water, it would react and start fizzing.

To aggravate things, I discovered the oil I was using is in fact a humectant, which was just helping my bombs suck up even more moisture from the air, and although they did set well, I was left with these crispy little biscuits that didn’t fizz at all – they just crumbled disappointingly in the water.

On to my recipe, using zero water and the right oil…

Waterless Recipe for humid climates: Rooibos Tea & Coconut Oil Bath Bombs

What you’ll need:

  • 100g Sodium Bicarbonate (2 parts)
  • 50g Citric Acid (1 part)
  • 10-20 ml Coconut Oil
  • Silicon mold

Optional:

  • Rooibos tea
  • Powdered food colouring

Waterless Recipe for humid climates: Coconut Oil Bath BombsCombine your dry ingredients in a bowl. Work the mixture with your hands. Make sure there are no clumps, and that it is well mixed. Add some powdered food colouring in teeny amounts at a time, and mix thoroughly.

Start adding coconut oil in small amounts. Use 1/4 teaspoon at a time, and work it in thoroughly with your fingertips. The oil might be buttery to start off with, but will soon turn liquid once you start working with it.

Squeeze a ball of the mixture in your fist. You’ll know it’s the right consistency if it stays together in a clump when squeezed. Stop adding oil at this point and pack the mixture into a mold. If you are adding Rooibos tea, sprinkle a thin layer in the mold before packing it.

Compress the mixture very firmly into the mold. Keep packing a compressing, until the bomb is the size you want, then pack and compress it some more!

Leave your bombs in the mold to dry out. The longer you leave them, the harder they will set. Mine were firm enough to handle after an hour, but I left them overnight to be safe.

Waterless Recipe for humid climates: Rooibos Tea & Coconut Oil Bath Bombs

Once they’ve set, seal your bombs in air-tight shrink wrap and remember to use them soon, as old bombs lose their fizziness.

You can fuse different shapes together by (carefully) wetting one surface with a finger dipped in water, and laying it on the second shape; then allow to dry thoroughly. I used little lollipop molds for the half-spheres, let them dry and then tapped them on the back to release the bombs.

Unique bath bombs: Fuse them by wetting one surface and sticking 2 shapes together

There are so many ways to decorate, colour and scent your bath bombs, but with this recipe don’t add anything water-based that might make your ingredients start reacting. I also wouldn’t add something that isn’t beneficial to your skin, seeing as you’re going to be soaking your entire body in it!

WAIT, IS THIS RECIPE SAFE FOR MY SKIN?

Yes. Even better, it is good for your skin!

Citric Acid is an alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA), which can help enhance skin cell turnover. Itโ€™s like a natural exfoliant, without the scrubbing.

Sodium Bicarbonate has been proven to help soothe the irritation caused by yeast infections, episiotomies, hemorrhoids and other similar ailments. It can help soften the skin and promote healing.

Rooibos tea has natural antioxidants in it that help clear the skin and delay the aging process. It also helps ease symptoms of eczema, psoriasis, rash, and acne. It is known for its soothing effect on the skin and senses and is a good way to wind down before bed.

Coconut oil is known to help reduce scaring, stretch marks and preserve skin elasticity. It helps to soothe rashes and burns, remove makeup and smooth frizzy hair.

Waterless Recipe for humid climates: Rooibos Tea & Coconut Oil Bath Bombs

Watch them fizz!

Here’s a short video of the bombs fizzing. I experimented with some colour too, making a pink one with blue inside it, for that magical-unicorn-bubbles effect…

FAQs:

Are Sodium Bicarbonate and Baking Soda the same thing?

Yes

What can I use instead of coconut oil?

An anti-humectant oil, like Palm Oil or Shea Butter.

Can I add essential oils?

Yes, if they are skin-friendly. 1-2 drops are enough.

How many bombs will this mixture make?

It depends on the size of your molds. I got six 25g bombs from this mixture, sized 60 x 50 x 10mm

Waterless Recipe for humid climates: Rooibos Tea & Coconut Oil Bath Bombs

I hope this helped those of you who were battling against humidity! ~ Jessie

Need some ideas for decorating and packaging your bombs? Check out my bath bomb board on Pinterest.

PIN IT!

Waterless Recipe for humid climates: Rooibos Tea & Coconut Oil Bath Bombs

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PAMELA GRIFFIN
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Thank goodness I found you! We live on the Gulf Coast in Mississippi and I was beginning to think I was bath bomb challenged. I followed all the regular recipes and always ended up with some weird blob in the morning. Yikes! Then I found you and your recipe for us humidity dwellers. I made your bath bombs and after 3 hours now, no blobs, just pretty little bath bombs. Thank you so much for creating this recipe and taking the time to let us in on it. Pam

Shara
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Shara

How hard are these? I mean can they be man handled without breaking or denting once dried?

Cherie
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Cherie

Can you use gel or reg food coloring? Or only the powdered?

Kate
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Kate

I am SO excited to try your recipe! I love on the coast in very humid Durban, South Africa and have tried about 9 recipes which all start out well but they will NOT dry out properly and I end up with fizzy messes on my counter! I will def be giving this a go tonight! Fingers crossed!

Miki
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Miki

I wanted to know, can I still add Corn Starch, Epsome Salts, SLSA and Gel food coloring?

Vanessa
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Vanessa

Consider getting a dehumidifier ๐Ÿ™‚ it’s worth it

Beth
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Beth

I live in Tennessee and have a humidity problem also. Will the dehumidifier work even though it 90% humidity out side and should I start i a day in advance?

Louise
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Louise

Thank you!!!!! I also live inside the waves and hadn’t even taken this into account!!!!! I was meant to find this page!

Deanne
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Deanne

Thank you xx Whats considered high humidity?? what number??

Lisa Grainger
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Lisa Grainger

10 to 20 ml of oil what is that in tea spoons? please

presley
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presley

Thank you so much for this!! I live in Houston so the humidity fluctuates tremendously, and once summer hit, my bath bombs would set off no matter how little water or alcohol I used. I can’t wait to try it!

Joan c
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Joan c

Doesnโ€™t coconut oil and sheโ€™s butter clog the drains

Joan
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Joan

I made these and they were great i even added essential oil only a few drops I left them over night in the mould then shrink wrapped them tried one was great ,just want to know as Iโ€™m making them for Easter as gifts how long do they last as I would like to make them a few weeks before Iโ€™m in England

vk rose
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vk rose

I can’t wait to try this! I live in the Tidewater/Southside area of Virginia, and the recipes I’ve been using haven’t been working. In a batch that’s supposed to make around 20 of the spheres, I maybe get ten usable ones. If I can get them out of the ball-molds, I put them in a container and surround them with dry silica, just to get them hard enough to handle getting shrink-wrapped. I’ve not any success with other molds at all. I just spent hours on a failed batch and when I get my energy back, I’ll try this! I’ve… Read more ยป